News

Gemma Irvine is new Head of Brand

MHP Communications today announces the appointment of Gemma Irvine as the new Head of its multi-award winning Brand practice.

Irvine, who joined the agency in 2008, has been promoted to lead the team who, with Engine, delivered the Missing Type campaign for NHS Blood and Transplant, which has received over 60 awards, including PR Week’s Best Campaign in 2016.

Other notable campaigns include Shop Small for American Express;  Chateau Peckham for Laithwaite’s and the launch of Baby Dove which saw MHP spark debate by using AI technology to create an image of the ‘perfect mum’ made from thousands of images of mums published in magazines, adverts and on social media.

Irvine’s appointment marks the latest shake-up of MHP’s senior team since CEO Alex Bigg joined last year, and reflects the ambition that he has for the 160-strong agency.

In September Nick Barron joined MHP as deputy CEO from Edelman, followed by Andy Bloxham who took over as head of the Corporate Affairs practice; Jamie Lyons who became joint head of Public Affairs alongside James Gurling; and Mike Robb from Cicero who is now head of Financial Services.

Bigg has also overseen the creation of a new MHP Media Unit, led by Ian Kirby, the former Political Editor of the News of the World, and staffed by many former national and broadcast journalists, among them Keith Gladdis, the former Executive News Editor of the Daily Mail, who joined the agency in May 2017.

There’s never been a better and more exciting time to lead the brilliant Brand team at MHP. PR is now at the forefront of strategic communications and our clients see us as the instigators of truly campaignable ideas that have reach across the comms mix - Gemma Irvine

Alex Bigg, MHP’s CEO, said: “Elevating Gemma to the lead role was an easy decision. Her track record of building trusted client relationships is outstanding. She understands how to stretch campaigns across the full spectrum of earned opportunities and deliver long-term brand transformation programmes.”